Independent Living Skills and Cognitive Disabilities: Reduce Anxiety, Solve Problems

Posts tagged ‘problem solving’

Independent Living: Going Shopping Today?

A picture of a wallet.

A picture of a wallet. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Being active in the community usually means that, if you’re going to be out for a few hours, you’re probably going to want something to eat or drink while you’re out. Here are a few ideas to consider before walking out the door:

Before Leaving Home

Fill a water bottle to keep hydrated while you’re away from home. Put it with your backpack or purse so you’ll remember it on the way out the door.

Put a nutrition bar, apple, or other healthy snack in your backpack or purse.

Check your wallet. Do you have a few dollars? It’s a good idea to have a little bit of money even if you are going for a short trip. If you are away from home  longer than you planned, you might want something to eat. If an unexpected problem arises, you may need to make a small purchase.

  • Some people like to fold their bills in half separately. This keeps the bills from sticking together when counting them out for a purchase.

If you’re planning to eat at a certain restaurant, look up the menu online and plan your meal purchase. Be sure to add tax. If you’re eating at a sit-down restaurant, add enough money for a tip. Is the total too high? Yes, those prices can add up fast. You might have to remove one item from your list.

  • Try not to spend all of your money on one meal. Order less food and then you’ll have money for a drink or other treat later in the day.
  • One rule of thumb I like to use is to order water at a sit-down restaurant in order to have enough money for a tip. It’s healthier, too.
  • Not a big appetite or short on cash? Don’t be shy about ordering from the children’s menu.  In my experience, restaurants are usually flexible in allowing anyone to order the smaller meals.

Have a great day shopping! It’s part of independent living.

(c) 2013 Smart Steps, LLC

Transition to Independent Living: What Happens After High School?

Students gather on the sidewalk in front of th...

Students gather on the sidewalk in front of the middle school after school on a Friday afternoon. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Individuals with disabilities go through many transitions in their school career as they progress through elementary, middle school and high school. At each stage, teams discuss how to make the transition as smooth as possible. What is expected at the next level? Will teachers understand his or her needs? How can we make it less stressful?Even more worrisome to some families might be… What happens after high school?Transition Planning Begins Early

Beginning in the middle school years, the IEP team plans for adulthood by writing transition goals related to education, work, and independent living. Transition goals are meant to help the team focus on the big picture as they write IEP goals.

Often, however, IEP goals are written to target state assessment objectives or class schedules. This is to be expected because schools are accountable for student learning as measured by assessments and high school credits. There’s one saving grace, though…

If IEP goals, including transition goals, have not been met by the time the student graduates from high school, he or she can receive transition services from the school district.

Transition Services Offered in the Community 

When transition services are offered through community-based instruction, students have more opportunities to apply skills in community settings, which in turn develop independence and confidence. This is a rich time for learning.

For more information, see http://www.ocali.org/project/transition_to_adulthood_guidelines

or this article from Easter Seals: www.easterseals.com/explore-resources/living-with-autism/autism-after-age-21

Smart Steps(TM), LLC (c)2013

http://www.smartsteps4me.com

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